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Game of Thrones and Porn

Welcome to Freedom Calling and our first blog! My name is Kimberly Davidson and I’m the director of education for Freedom Calling. My objective through these blogs is to present you with an accurate and truthful picture of what is going on in our communities and the world. Please pray for these situations and ask God to give you direction on how you might be able to help. Thank you for taking the time to read and follow our blogs, and get involved in such a worthy ministry.

Our topic today is: Game of Thrones and Porn

HBO’s Game of Thrones began airing its sixth season a few weeks ago, to fans’ delight. Though the show is replete with gratuitous sex, nudity, violence, sexual violence, language, and other vulgarities, it only continues to increase in popularity, both in viewer numbers and in social media buzz. Yet, after 54 episodes, a disheartening trend has begun to emerge.

According to statistics recently released by Pornhub, right after the premiere of Season 6, explicit searches including the title “Game of Thrones” increased by 370%. In addition, 4% of U.S. porn viewers stopped watching “adult” content to watch the episode. But most eye-opening was this comment from the site: “We discovered that Game of Thrones has remained a popular search on Pornhub due in part to…fans hoping to find a glimpse of the nudity and sex that the series is known for.” In other words, GoT has become a gateway drug: The show exposes viewers to softcore pornography, and they turn to the Internet hoping to get more.

So let’s be real: The show’s immense popularity paired with the fact that it can be accessed easily and secretly on any device via HBO Now means it would be naive of us to think students aren’t watching it. Even more so, for those who are watching it, the chances they have also accessed or been tempted to access even harder content are much higher.

Online pornography is ubiquitous and serious—we need to talk to our children about it, starting at young ages. But shows like GoT are also a big deal. We need to have ongoing conversations with students about why they’re not just “harmless” and how they hijack our visions of adventure, relationships, sexuality, etc., giving us substitutes that seem exciting and worthwhile, but only enslave us in the end.

Questions to ask: How do we decide what TV shows and movies are “ok” to watch? What has a pass and what doesn’t? Why? How do holiness and purity relate to this issue? Is there something in our lives that might start off as innocent but lead to greater sin?

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